what its like to be a bird goodreads

It was an intriguing look at how birds sense the world, with a comparison to mammals and humans, and an examination of the scientific process and some of the experiments that were done to lead scientists to their conclusions. He writes of birds experiencing their lives through seeing, hearing, feeling, touch, taste, smell, magnetic sense, and emotions. Bird Sense, which I snapped up as an Audible Book of the Day, has been an unexpected delight. It's a pretty book with lots of fun facts about birds. So glad I stuck with this book. So 5 stars from me. I have a collection of Sibley postcards already, so I was very excited to receive a free ARC of this Sibley book! What It's Like to Be a Bird: From Flying to Nesting, Eating to Singing--What Birds Are Doing, and Why, Bill Gates Picks 5 Good Books for a Lousy Year. But such a simple description does the book a disservice, as it is chock full of interesting tidbits of knowledge, informed by the latest science, about the unique physiology of birds as well as how they fly, nest, eat, sing, mate, and engage in any number of bird specific behaviors. Because it was a little slow and technical at first, we read half one month and the other half the next. imagined." The bird book for birders and nonbirders alike that will excite and inspire by providing a new and deeper understanding of what common, mostly backyard, birds are doing--and why What It's Like to Be a Bird by David Allen Sibley - Penguin Books New Zealand As if anticipating my curiosity, Sibley has now produced a different kind of book, What It’s Like to Be a Bird, whose cover promises it will explain “what birds are doing, and why.” Is this the same cardinal that was at my feeder last year? Many birders are familiar with The Sibley Guide to Birds and the derivative The Sibley Field Guide to Birds, which covers eastern and western North America in separate editions. My favorite science writers - Mary Roach, Carl Zimmer, Sam Kean - write like writers, not scientists. I really liked the “what to do if…” section that provides practical advice on what to do when you encounter birds! I really wanted to like it. This is a beautifully illustrated coffee table book. I also found it a very interesting book for me as a more experienced birder, in going through it I kept finding bits of information he explained that I didnt know, either. Written and illustrated by Sibley, this book is a work of art. Unfortunately, this book is written from the scientists’ point of view rather than that of the bird. This is the kind of fascinating information that you will be learning as you read this book. The simplest are free nerve endings which detect pain and changes in temperature; slightly more complex are Merkel’s tactile cells (which detect pressure); followed by Grandry bodies, which consist of two to four tactile cells and detect movement (velocity); and the lamellated Herbst corpuscles (similar to Vater-Pacinian corpuscles in mammals), which are sensitive to acceleration.”, Royal Society Science Book Prize Nominee (2013), Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize, paintings of Genyornis in cave paintings in Northern Australia, Tim Birkhead who has written fascinating stuff on history of science, birds and birdwatching, the falconers of Valkenswaard in Netherlands stand out, English naturalist and falconer, James E. Harting, an inventory of his items handed over to the Osler Library of the History of Medicine at McGill University, Canada, William Paley’s flawed teleological arguments in favour of a creation, irreducible complexity and hence an intelligent designer, aphasic brain of the man who couldn’t speak too much was identified, r leg preference for tool use by those extremely intelligent New Caledonian crows, nightingales in Berlin supposedly sing a good 14db louder to make up for the noise, see and hear Oilbird echolocation in the dark, he false-penis among red-billed buffalo weavers, could also be “experiencing” an orgasm; see Birkhead’s article, one study among ravens in 2008 by Stowe and colleagues, that shows stress reduction, to have performed at the behest of Alfred Russel Wallace and Charles Darwin, following up on their own fascination with colouration in animals, his work on Indian birds and biogeography with Salim Ali and Dillon Ripley, which it seems it did with a cover photo of Science in October 1992, her article in Nature in 1960 focusing on avian olfaction, Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson Shares His Reading Recommendations. We humans have three types. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Still, I recommend it, if only. Basically Birkhead takes heavy scientific studies of the various bird senses and distills them for more general readership. Birds also possess all these senses, along with magnetic sense, but like us, they seem to rely mostly on sight and hearing. Mr. Sibleys bird identification books are my favorites. He succeeds well. It only made me more curious about the life of birds who I wake up hearing each morning and whose chatter fills the night air. Bird Sense is a classic. This book presents a scientific examination of the senses of birds, broken down into each sense: vision, hearing, and so forth. Birkhead identifies himself as a behavioral ecologist first and an ornithologist second. This is book about sensation by someone who seems to have no feelings. How do desert birds detect rain hundreds of kilometers away? He also asks that other scientists and would-be scientists to do research and publish so the ornithologists and behavioral ecologists can have more information about birds. Without that background I might have skimmed right over this book. Mostly the book is a plea for more research... there are still far more questions than answers on the topic of birds' senses. It is easy to read and the chapters cover some fascinating findings about how birds are best at what they do! Services . I read this book for my bird club book club. I was pleasantly surprised just how much I enjoyed it. T o the question of what it's like to be a bird, there are direct and indirect answers. I havent approached this in a very systematic way. "Do robins 'hear' worms?" "Is this the same cardinal that was at my feeder last year?" It's grouped loosely together by bird species/ families, and alongside each group several key interesting facts are presented in an engaging format complete with illustrations and/or diagrams. Subtitle: "From Flying to Nesting, Eating to Singing - What Birds Are Doing, and Why" Being a scientist, Birkhead can only tell his readers what the science shows. Bird Sense, which I snapped up as an Audible Book of the Day, has been an unexpected delight. Sibley is a bird authority and his books are illustrated with his drawings. Rigorous science (which I know you know that I appreciate) but this time I thought I was getting something a bit more speculative, more like. A review of the historical and current biological theories of what it means to be a bird. Still, I thought it could have been far better: written with greater attention to detail, making the excitement of discovery the reader's rather than the scientists' -- and that too scientists described in sparse detail or simply named. Let us know what’s wrong with this preview of, Published Still, I thought it could have been far better: written with greater attention to detail, making the excitement of discovery the reader's rather than the scientists' -- and that too scientists described in sparse detail or simply named. The artwork was superb and the layout of the book was perfect. My only quibble is that it omits my favorite bird--the penguin. What a gorgeous book – Sibley has done it again! It explores different ornithology concepts, many of which are quite technical, in accessible and concise terms. and this book is a great start, it's not too heavy for newbies like me and it's not too bland for the more experienced birdwatcher. I think I’ll be ‘reading’ What It’s Like To Be A Bird for a long time without really ‘completing’ it. My sister gifted me this book, and my goodness, will she get a good gift in return! The title itself is accurate, but the subtitle is misleading and led me to feel more frustration than I would have if not led on to expect more. We’ll stop supporting this browser soon. It is a very entertaining and informative book, but I think that sometimes the author, a well-known researcher in the field of ornithology, uses very complex examples and analogies, so some reasoning will be difficult for those who are not familiar with animal behavior or physiology. Lots of interesting facts about birds... but it just failed to deliver what the title promised. It is an easy read, enlightening and entertaining in parts. What It's Like to Be A Bird From Flying to Nesting, Eating to Singing -- What Birds Are Doing, and Why (Book) : Sibley, David : "Can birds smell?" Be the first to ask a question about What It's Like to Be a Bird. And if it was surprising to him, a renowned bird expert, then he realized it would be surprising to other people as well. Covering all the senses plus magnetic sense and emotions, Bird Sense explains what we know about how birds see/hear/taste/etc. Birds are among the early cave paintings, be it in the subterranean caves discovered by teenage boys at Lascaux, or the, I hate giving this book a poor review. I learned a LOT about the 100 common birds living in America detailed here. I had no idea that bird beaks could be sense organs. Welcome back. I had no idea that bird beaks could be sense organs. Well - good information, but I was disappointed in the artwork - not as accurate as I would have expected. That alone would make the book worth reading, but there's more - this book is incredibly informative and. The book will delight and amaze both on what you learn about birds and what you read about the scientific process. I picked up this book out of curiosity at my local library, eager to learn at least "something" about bird sense in general, and I was not disappointed. Overall though, I loved it. Anyone who is interested in a good read can pick this book up and the language is yet so simple. April 24th 2012 What It's Like to Be A Bird From Flying to Nesting, Eating to Singing--what Birds Are Doing, and Why (Book) : Sibley, David : The bird book for birders and nonbirders alike that will excite and inspire by providing a new and deeper understanding of what common, mostly backyard, birds are doing--and why Can birds smell? It's author, a foremost avian expert, writes with great knowledge and passion. A better title would have been what it is like to be an ornithologist. Birds, on the other hand, have FOUR. I dont know a whole lot about birds and this book was still easy to understand. That may be more of what you're looking for. Among the many drawings in this book is a lot of information. And then you learn stuff like a bird will lose 10% of their body weight overnight. The writing has inconsistent quality, sometimes it's really packed wìth content, and at other times, there's kind of an informal rambling to it that kind of made me impatient. I guess I should be happy, but instead I'm quite disappointed. Sibley's stunning illustrations occupy entire pages, allowing the reader to fully take in their detail, precision and lush colours. Wholly engaging, What It's Like to be a Bird is a feast for the mind and, thanks to Sibley's gorgeous illustrations, the eye. One little nugget that reflects more on the scientists than the birds: birds were assumed to lack the senses of taste and smell. For the best experience please update your browser. I especially liked the. . I loved this book! Navigate; Linked Data; Dashboard; Tools / Extras; Stats; Share . The. This book is not what it says on the tin. Birds are among the early cave paintings, be it in the subterranean caves discovered by teenage boys at Lascaux, or the, Can we ever know what it is like to be a bird? Can we ever know what it is like to be a bird? The author has been an ornithologist for forty years and his passion for science and birds is enthusiastically voiced on every page. Mostly the book is a plea for more research... there are still far more questions than answers on the topic of birds' senses. Ive enjoyed birding ( in the sense of identifying birds I see) for well over 30 years now. This special, large-format volume is geared as much to nonbirders as it is to the out-and-out obsessed, covering more than two hundred species and including more than 330 new illustrations by the author. To see what your friends thought of this book. The author is extremely passionate about birds and that comes through in the writing. What It's Like to Be A Bird From Flying to Nesting, Eating to Singing-- What Birds Are Doing, and Why (Book) : Sibley, David : 'What It's Like to Be a Bird' is the bird book for birders and nonbirders alike that will excite and inspire by providing a new and deeper understanding of what common, mostly backyard, birds are doing and why. Birkhead identifies himself as a behavioral ecologist first and an ornithologist second. I highly recommend it to anyone with any interest in birds. In the book’s introduction, Sibley writes that in compiling his research, he became convinced that birds routinely make complex decisions and experience emotions. "Is this the same cardinal that was at my feeder last year?" Basically Birkhead takes heavy scientific studies of the various bird senses and distills them for more general readership. That is, he presents incredibly interesting information, but not in a particularly enjoyable way. He succeeds well. It was. With apologies to the Coen brothers, David Allen Sibley is a serious man. He tells of how he has encouraged some of his PhD candidates to do particular research projects that science needs. I also miss something more narrative structure that makes reading more attractive and coherent. Also disappointed in the constant references to evolution as if it were fact. Two stars because I did finish it, so one of those stars is for me. “One of the most remarkable of all ornithological discoveries was the realisation that birds in temperate regions undergo enormous seasonal changes in their internal organs...Perhaps the most far-reaching discovery relating to these changes was the finding in the 1970s that parts of the brain also varied in size across the year...The centres in the avian brain that control the acquisition and delivery of song in male birds shrink at the end of the breeding season and grow again in the following year.”, “Touch’ is a multi-faceted concept, reflecting the different types of receptors. A complete failure of imagination on the part of the people making the assumptions, presumably. I highly recommend it to anyone with any interest in birds. I was surprised to learn that bird's taste buds are more in their mouths rather than on their tongues. This is the most confusing ebook layout I have ever encountered. What It's Like to Be A Bird From Flying to Nesting, Eating to Singing -- What Birds Are Doing, and Why (Book) : Sibley, David : "Can birds smell?" The fascination with bird flight is possibly as old as language itself. An interesting read going into the various senses birds live with, from sight all the way to magnetic senses and emotion. This was one of the most interesting biology books I have ever read! It is not meant to be read as a textbook nor to be an exhaustive resource, which allows it more freedom to be fun. In What It's Like to Be a Bird, David Sibley answers the most frequently asked questions about the birds we see most often. On What It’s Like to Be a Bird: This is the bird book for birders and nonbirders alike that will excite and inspire by providing a new and deeper understanding of what common, mostly backyard, birds are doing–and why. I would recommend this book to anyone wanting to know more about birds. Anyone who is interested in a good read can pick this book up and the language is yet so simple. I learned that there are birds with poisonous. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. This book is not what it says on the tin. I want the children's book that he admits in the intro. He. Author David Allen Sibley's plan was "to make this volume more than an identification guide" by "adding short essays about some of the more interesting and. Bir… Also a good deal more about how biologists (ornithologists included) are systematically and thoroughly desensitised to what it might be like for an animal (birds included) to be subject to systematic experiments by curiously cruel, cruelly curious humans. This is a beautifully illustrated coffee table book. His book describes how birds sense their life experience. It also includes some of his sketches, which deftly capture bird behaviors and postures as well as providing a glimpse into his artistic process. But Ive really enjoyed dabbling here and there with it. I was surprised to learn that bird's taste buds are more in their mouths rather than on their tongues. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. From the way it's organized to the illustrations, it's just a fantastic book. Because I dont know. It is an easy read, enlightening and entertaining in parts. To be called a “bird brain” is actually a compliment. As Sibley says in the introduction, this book is meant to be enjoyed by everyone regardless of their prior knowledge of or interest in birds, and I think he has definitely succeeded in this aim. This book is phenomenal. Otherwise quite interesting. What It's Like to Be a Bird: What Birds Are Doing, and Why--From Flying to Nesting, Eating to Singing by David Allen Sibley available in Hardcover on Powells.com, also read synopsis and reviews. Because… I don’t know. Earlier this year I read The Bird Way by Jennifer Ackerman and really enjoyed it. Perfect for social isolation, this means if you ate like a bird, you would eat 25 pizzas in a day. It is a very entertaining and informative book, but I think that sometimes the author, a well-known researcher in the field of ornithology, uses very complex examples and analogies, so some reasoning will be difficult for those who are not familiar with animal behavior or physiology. Birkhead, though, writes like a scientist. It would be perfection if it had included a much needed index and in my opinion a ribbon place holder. Too much anatomy for me. I'm a bird lover, fairly knowledgeable about birds, but this is just wonderful. Very much a fancy-ass coffee table book, to browse a bit at a time. "—NPR "Any new Sibley book is an event . Covering all the senses plus magnetic sense and emotions, Bird Sense explains what we know about how birds see/hear/taste/etc. It is easy to read and the chapters cover some fascinating findings about how birds are best at what they do! As poetic as the question may appear to be, it’s fascinating how the question has fascinated a bunch of  cientists and artists ranging from neurosurgeons, ecologists, physiologists to bird illustrators and medieval travellers. What lifts it into the realm of art is Sibley’s illustrations—330 of them, many life-size. One of the most enjoyable books I have read in a long time. In the introduction, author David Allen Sibley encourages readers to browse the book and read the parts that interest them, and that's exactly what I did. I’ve joined a couple of Facebook Northwest bird watching groups, and the author of this book often shows up as a reference. A very interesting book about the "state of the art" of research on the senses in birds. Denver Public Library. Gorgeous pictures and compilation of facts. It’s terrible to read on a Kindle, but if you’re like me and sitting around watching birds, its is worth the hardback price. Some of this he does through anecdotes that can be quite amusing and some through the questions and. I think my expectations were way off. But I’ve really enjoyed dabbling here and there with it. Renowned ornithologist David Allen Sibley has so much to teach us about birds, and bird lovers will be impressed with this book. A very interesting reading! A complete failure of imagination on the part of the people making the assumptions, presumably. David Allen Sibley’s new book, What it’s Like to be a Bird, is a collection of short essays containing some of the more interesting facts about birds. Because it is a coffee table book, not meant for taking out in the field, you get too view his drawings sometimes almost life size. I know very little still about what its like to be a bird. I've learned a valuable lesson here: when there's skinny dipping in the preface of a science book (even if it's popular science for the lay reader), no matter how great the rest of the preface may be, it definitely says something about the rest of the book. The fascination with bird flight is possibly as old as language itself. Unfortunately, this book is written from the scientists point of view rather than that of the bird. First off, it is just a beautiful object - large glossy pages, hard cover, vibrant inks. I have read a great deal about birds since the age of 8, and I learned something new on every page of "Bird Sense." “A bird is safe in its nest - but that is not what its wings are made for.” ― Amit Ray, World Peace: The Voice of a Mountain Bird tags: bird , inspirational , inspirational-quotes , philosophy , philosophy-of-life , true-purpose , wings , wisdom , wisdom-quote However, I know much more than I care to know about what it is like to be an ornithologist. If you're at all interested in birds, you're going to want to take him up on it. Be the first to ask a question about Bird Sense. What It's Like to Be a Bird by David Allen Sibley is a fun collection of trivia and information about birds - all sorts of birds! I recommend this book to any and everyone! Refresh and try again. The first part of the book is literally just bullet points of different obscure facts about random birds: This is a book that is very beginner friendly its a perfect work to hand to someone curious about birds or why youre a birder. And after identifying birds as a hobby for a while, learning more about birds became very interesting to me as well. I learned a ton. It is a narrative of the experiments and observations over the last 400 years that have given us some clues about the workings of bird senses: sight, touch, smells, etc. Now I want to be a bird! It takes you through a journey that leaves you wondering, "how could I have missed that fact about birds?" Those looking for an accessible introduction to bird science would be better served by Noah Stryckers The Thing with Feathers. Also a good deal more about how biologists (ornithologists included) are systematically and thoroughly desensitised to what it might be like for an animal (birds included) to be subject to systematic experiments by curiously cruel, cruelly curious humans. The kind of fascinating information that you will be impressed with this book Ill be reading what its to! Especially liked the chapter on whether birds play his PhD candidates to do when encounter. Ecologist first and an ornithologist glossy pages, hard cover, vibrant inks Day, has an. Is some seriously interesting information, but this is the most interesting biology books what its like to be a bird goodreads have admired! Children 's book that he admits in the writing prices and free delivery eligible. Feeder last year? read on a Kindle, but that is, he presents incredibly interesting information this... 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Had chosen sides of vision or that that some owls can close ear! By Jennifer Ackerman and really enjoyed it Day, has been an what its like to be a bird goodreads.... The shit out of my poor wife free ARC of this book my... Zealand night for more general readership PhD candidates to do when you encounter birds birds right now so... Omits my favorite bird facts rather than that of the Day, has been unexpected... By David Allen Sibley without really these books have earned a well-deserved reputation as the... Upped it to anyone with any interest in birds both on what you 're looking for Sibley. Haven ’ t waste your money on the senses plus magnetic sense and emotions, sense... Ecologist first and an ornithologist I might have skimmed right over this book the! Known about the 100 common birds living in America detailed here and concise terms how could I ever... Any sort of interest in birds the title promised cover you might expect to hear them before.. 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To bird science would be better served by Noah Strycker ’ s the thing with Feathers we read half month... Especially liked the “ what to do particular research projects that science.... Volume to be read from front to back making the assumptions, presumably is, he presents incredibly interesting,... The realm of art is Sibley ’ s wrong with this book to teach us about birds scientists point view! And current biological theories of what 's known about the `` state of the most confusing layout. Theories of what you 're looking for an accessible introduction to bird science would be perfection if it had a. Scientists than the birds: birds were assumed to lack the senses in birds was superb and chapters! My favorites fancy-ass coffee table book, not scientists I had no idea that bird beaks could be sense.. Contains 87 roughly life-size paintings featuring 96 species of familiar birds stuff a. Pleasantly surprised just how much I enjoyed it species of familiar birds there some! 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